This whole recording of Alan Watts is worth listening too, but I've marked it to start at minute 21:44, which is...

This whole recording of Alan Watts is worth listening too, but I’ve marked it to start at minute 21:44, which is…

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This whole recording of Alan Watts is worth listening too, but I’ve marked it to start at minute 21:44, which is where he talks about humanity, our technology and our relationship with the natural world. It’s just a few minutes long and very worthwhile.

(Also, for those of you who are familiar with George Lakoff and his “don’t think of an elephant” idea, I wonder whether he got that from Watts and this talk, or if the roots go back even further to someone else.)

https://www.youtube.com/attribution_link?a=QyWpIVOmD7w&u=/watch?v%3DvNKOUhx-7qk%26feature%3Dshare

20 comments

  1. Thanks Gideon Rosenblatt​

    Really Appreciate Heads Up !!!

  2. How ‘ Refreshing-to-Unfurl Belief-Systems with Actual Understanding of Reality Versus Mental Thought Perceptions…”

  3. Watts is interesting, though he largely proved the invalidity of the presumption that one could survive drinking a fifth of vodka daily.

    His premise that technology is fundamentally material strikes me as objectively false. Information and organisation are technological. They are not material.

  4. Thank you Gideon Rosenblatt

  5. Ah… The Sage of Sausalito… If you start really listening to what he’s saying, after a while you’ll get it and you kinda wake up…

  6. Edward Morbius ” he largely proved the invalidity of the presumption that one could survive drinking a fifth of vodka daily.”

    lol, true, but those who didn’t have a fifth of vodka daily ended up dead just like him, haven’t they…. I’m sure he would do a very interesting lecture on that one, and laugh his azz off… together with his pall Timothy Leary

  7. George Kozi 58’s rather young, and his last few years went poorly.

  8. Edward Morbius If you listened to him, he would tell you about Brahman being Atman and the Self… all of them… IT playing in Lila.

    We are in the play, and we write it as we play it. His last years may be exactly what the “aperture” called Allen Watts needed to make his part o9f the Play interesting.

    It’s about the play, not about our expectations of the play. Expectations -= illusion. The real actor is bigger than any of us. We are IT, but we look at it from a different. our very own angle. That’s Samsara.

    And despite appearances, Tat twam Asi.

  9. I do not understand AW’s love for radio astronomy. That technology is created by a large and complex industry, which causes pollution and creates technological gadgets that ultimately wear out and become big pieces of junk. I would have expected him to say that if you want to understand the rock on Mars, then you should just contemplate it and you will know because you and it are one and the same.

  10. Edward Morbius, I don’t know the story of his life, but you’re making me want to find out more. He’s such a character to listen to. His voice makes him sound like he’s in his sixties or seventies. Maybe that’s the hard life showing up in his voice.

    I’m not so sure his point is that technology is inherently material so much as that the attitude we assume with it is aggressive and very male in the yin-yang sense.

  11. George Kozi, I know what you mean. I have that same experience listening to him, to Adyashanti and to Rupert Spira.

  12. Gideon Rosenblatt He’s far more accurate culturally than technically.

    And yes, he’s interesting to listen to. I just have him pegged with “exercise restraint on enthusiasm”.

    He was part of a local Bohemian cluster in Marin County, just north of San Francisco. Their encampment / homestead was just opposite Muir Woods. There is some video on YouTube of this, early 1970s.

  13. Benjamin Wright IronSmith, I just finished reading Walk Away by Cory Doctorow. And your comment about not infringing on the rights of others made me think about some of your other comments on other posts and it reminded me about a central theme running through the book: which is meritocracy. You might enjoy the book even though I’ve a feeling you won’t agree with much of it.

    As for the person as individual, what Watts is trying to do here is to break down that concrete sense that most of us have that we are somehow separate from the rest of the Universe.

  14. Edward Morbius, thanks. I know that area. May have to dig into that more if I get a bit more time.

  15. Thanks, I enjoyed this!

  16. Thinking that deeply, id take the latter.

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