This is fascinating. Researchers now have a working prosthesis that improves memory performance in humans. In test...

This is fascinating. Researchers now have a working prosthesis that improves memory performance in humans. In test…

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This is fascinating. Researchers now have a working prosthesis that improves memory performance in humans. In test results, subjects experienced a 37% increase in memory performance, which surprised the researchers.

There is still a lot of work ahead, and the researchers note that we are still probably decades away from devices for use in routine situations.

Thanks for catching this one, David Amerland.

Originally shared by David Amerland

Augmented Brains Are Coming

Well, not on their own of course. They are housed inside human skulls. In probably the clearest sign yet that we live in the age of human brain power where we seek to make the most of what’s between our ears, researchers have successfully used what is potentially a brain implant to boost memory recall. The story is fascinating and it indicates where things are heading.

https://www.wired.com/story/hippocampal-neural-prosthetic/

11 comments

  1. So it’s basically a memory extension? A Random Brain-Access Memory? Cool!

  2. Gideon Rosenblatt you are welcome and it is fascinating. Basically, when we manage to remember something short term, like the phone number of a girl you like and you’ve just met, it is because it is really important to us. The electrical signals associated with the memory creation in such a case are particularly strong which means the memory being created, however transient, is also strong. The device used here basically, artificially reinforces the neural connections by boosting the electrical signal which make the connections stronger (almost like steroids for the brain). Fascinating and scary alike. I wonder if there are any drawbacks like the brain deciding to lessen the strength of normal electrical signalling which then might make memory formation without augmentation a poorer experience.

  3. David Amerland that’s a really interesting question about whether the brain would just up the ante to compensate. I’ve a feeling that the body will resolve in unpredictable ways.

  4. Gideon Rosenblatt from a physical point of view we are a homeostatic machine. Anything that augments us will also affect that balance.

  5. Don Krypton I LOVE it: RBAM. DDR4 RBAM, ha. Gideon Rosenblatt You make a really good point, because if we’re unnaturally stimulating specific areas of the brain or specific time frames to trigger stronger memory/recall, perhaps without such stimulation our ability to remember falters due to the relative weakness in neural stimulation. Gideon, is there a way I can follow you? Just began using Google+. If you have a blog or produce research or a website, I’d love to subscribe/follow. Thanks!

  6. Thanks for you note, Emma Muhleman, and welcome to Google+. Despite all the bashing in the press, this is still the best place for having in-depth conversations like this on the web (in my opinion).

    Anyway, yes, thanks for asking. Here is a link to my blog, the Vital Edge:

    the-vital-edge.com – The Vital Edge by Gideon Rosenblatt

  7. well, it’s cool.If applied on a student like I, if you don’t mind and how it works. anyway how is it like? is it like a pill ????

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