“These cost declines across technologies are unprecedented and representative of the degree to which renewable...

“These cost declines across technologies are unprecedented and representative of the degree to which renewable…

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“These cost declines across technologies are unprecedented and representative of the degree to which renewable energy is disrupting the global energy system,” said Mr Amin.

#energy #sustainabilty

http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/renewable-energy-cheaper-fossil-fuels-2020-uk-green-climate-change-global-warming-report-irea-a8160051.html

30 comments

  1. We still have the basics to cover: reducing the energy each one of us needs because 10 billions is a lot and scaling up.

    e360.yale.edu – Green Energy’s Big Challenge: The Daunting Task of Scaling Up

  2. We still have the basics to cover: reducing the energy each one of us needs because 10 billions is a lot and scaling up.

    e360.yale.edu – Green Energy’s Big Challenge: The Daunting Task of Scaling Up

  3. Renewable energy sources are hugely important to our future, but bring their own predictable costs: we’re running out of sand, a key source of convertible silicon compounds, which, in turn, are the key element in solar cells, glass, and electronics:

    Sand and gravel are now the most-extracted materials in the world, exceeding fossil fuels and biomass (measured by weight). Sand is a key ingredient for concrete, roads, glass and electronics. Massive amounts of sand are mined for land reclamation projects, shale gas extraction and beach renourishment programs. Recent floods in Houston, India, Nepal and Bangladesh will add to growing global demand for sand.

    In 2010, nations mined about 11 billion tonnes of sand just for construction. Extraction rates were highest in the Asia-Pacific region, followed by Europe and North America. In the United States alone, production and use of construction sand and gravel was valued at $8.9 billion in 2016, and production has increased by 24 percent in the past five years.

    Mining for natural resources isn’t bad because of what we mine, it’s bad because we mine at all.

    Even if we ignore the environmental factors, and we have been and likely will continue to do so, decreasing supply and the increasing difficulty in extracting what remains will introduce an inflection point in the cost-time curve. In essence, sand will be the new oil.

    smithsonianmag.com – The World is Running Out of Sand

  4. Renewable energy sources are hugely important to our future, but bring their own predictable costs: we’re running out of sand, a key source of convertible silicon compounds, which, in turn, are the key element in solar cells, glass, and electronics:

    Sand and gravel are now the most-extracted materials in the world, exceeding fossil fuels and biomass (measured by weight). Sand is a key ingredient for concrete, roads, glass and electronics. Massive amounts of sand are mined for land reclamation projects, shale gas extraction and beach renourishment programs. Recent floods in Houston, India, Nepal and Bangladesh will add to growing global demand for sand.

    In 2010, nations mined about 11 billion tonnes of sand just for construction. Extraction rates were highest in the Asia-Pacific region, followed by Europe and North America. In the United States alone, production and use of construction sand and gravel was valued at $8.9 billion in 2016, and production has increased by 24 percent in the past five years.

    Mining for natural resources isn’t bad because of what we mine, it’s bad because we mine at all.

    Even if we ignore the environmental factors, and we have been and likely will continue to do so, decreasing supply and the increasing difficulty in extracting what remains will introduce an inflection point in the cost-time curve. In essence, sand will be the new oil.

    smithsonianmag.com – The World is Running Out of Sand

  5. Michael Verona yes and since we recycle only a small portion of what we consume, sand is one such non renewable resource amongst thousands we grew to be dependent of.

  6. Michael Verona yes and since we recycle only a small portion of what we consume, sand is one such non renewable resource amongst thousands we grew to be dependent of.

  7. Great for our inviroment

  8. Great for our inviroment

  9. Michael Verona, wow, thanks. First time I’d heard that we are running out of sand. Ugh.

  10. Michael Verona, wow, thanks. First time I’d heard that we are running out of sand. Ugh.

  11. Gideon Rosenblatt​ – Me too. We’re eating the world, and I’m not sure how not to.

    Freaks me out a bit.

  12. Gideon Rosenblatt​ – Me too. We’re eating the world, and I’m not sure how not to.

    Freaks me out a bit.

  13. I hope it happens.Imagine millions of dark colored solar panels absorbing the sun’s heat,speeding up global warming.I will be growing pineapples in Canada very soon.

  14. I hope it happens.Imagine millions of dark colored solar panels absorbing the sun’s heat,speeding up global warming.I will be growing pineapples in Canada very soon.

  15. Mining for sand along our rivers, our beaches, some agricultural land – is an issue in South Africa.

  16. Mining for sand along our rivers, our beaches, some agricultural land – is an issue in South Africa.

  17. Meanwhile, American Shale energy production is soaring. A decade ago experts said we were going to run out of energy. But a multitude of Technologies have emerged to prevent that from happening.

  18. Meanwhile, American Shale energy production is soaring. A decade ago experts said we were going to run out of energy. But a multitude of Technologies have emerged to prevent that from happening.

  19. Benjamin Wright At what Cost? Death of the planet?

  20. Benjamin Wright At what Cost? Death of the planet?

  21. Solar power is our future,’n is here to stay……

  22. Solar power is our future,’n is here to stay……

  23. Eli Fennell I am an amateur when it comes to understanding energy policy and economics. Thanks to your good comment, I did some quick casual research, and found little that specifically predicted we would run out of energy. I guess a more accurate statement is that recent-invented oil extraction technologies like fracking and horizontal drilling have changed the economics of oil as an energy source. The price of a gallon of gasoline in my neighborhood right now is about $2.30. To this amateur, that feels like a low price.

  24. Eli Fennell I am an amateur when it comes to understanding energy policy and economics. Thanks to your good comment, I did some quick casual research, and found little that specifically predicted we would run out of energy. I guess a more accurate statement is that recent-invented oil extraction technologies like fracking and horizontal drilling have changed the economics of oil as an energy source. The price of a gallon of gasoline in my neighborhood right now is about $2.30. To this amateur, that feels like a low price.

  25. Fracking is causing so much damage

  26. Fracking is causing so much damage

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