Neuro-aesthetics: the growing understanding of how we appreciate what is before our eyes. It’s quite complex, as…

Neuro-aesthetics: the growing understanding of how we appreciate what is before our eyes. It’s quite complex, as you’d expect.

“Our own experiences and knowledge also have a profound effect on how we experience art. People rate abstract art as more attractive when they are told it is from a museum, as opposed to generated by a computer. This preference produces greater neural activity in the medial orbitofrontal and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Believing an image to be a museum piece also produces more activity in the entorhinal cortex, an area important for episodic memory. Similarly, people’s ventral striatum and parts of the orbitofrontal cortex are more responsive to the “art status” or the authenticity of a painting than to its actual sensory content. Again, knowledge, more than the hedonic qualities of the visual image, modulates these neural activation patterns.”

HT: Derya Unutmaz​

Susanne Ramharter​, I’ve a feeling you will enjoy this.

Originally shared by Alessandro Littara

The artistic brain.

What in the brain triggers aesthetic experiences? And how does knowledge of basic brain mechanisms inform our understanding of these experiences? These questions are at the heart of an emerging discipline dedicated to exploring the neural processes underlying our appreciation and production of beautiful objects and artwork, experiences that include perception, interpretation, emotion, and action. This new field represents a convergence of neuroscience and empirical aesthetics—the study of aesthetics rooted in observation—and is dubbed neuroaesthetics, a term coined in the 1990s by vision neuroscientist Semir Zeki of University College London. Neuroaesthetics is both descriptive and experimental, with qualitative observations and quantitative tests of hypotheses, aimed at advancing our understanding of how humans process beauty and art.

http://goo.gl/FYW9da

Larger view: http://www.the-scientist.com/May2014/brain_full.jpg

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