An interesting argument: will automated convenience be reserved for the high-end of the market, especially in…

An interesting argument: will automated convenience be reserved for the high-end of the market, especially in supermarkets? I don’t think so, actually, but here’s an interesting argument for that point:

But to me, Amazon Go represents something more chilling than a direct threat to storefronts. It feels like a physical embodiment of the larger social transformations its online parent has helped create. A segment of upscale-good shoppers—people like me, spenders on kombucha and goat cheese—will get to shop hassle-free, whether it’s online, at a Whole Foods, or one of its newly decked-out competitors. That’s great for us. But that leaves a lot of other people out of the equation, because they can’t afford online delivery, or because they live in neighborhoods where groceries can no longer justify the cost of operating. (At least one online petition has been launched to encourage Amazon Go to accept SNAP benefits, the federal food assistance program.) That could fray cohesion in those communities and, maybe, push apart the social mix that grocery stores can do so well. And never mind all those retail workers, who more or less disappear from the privileged shopper’s view.

HT Andrea Learned.

https://www.citylab.com/life/2018/03/the-unbearable-sadness-of-amazon-go/555254/
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